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A soldier stands guard near the site where two Chinese language teachers were kidnapped by unidentified gunmen, in Quetta, Pakistan May 24, 2017. REUTERS/Naseer Ahmed "We are already alert, but this incident has made us extra vigilant over Chinese security," said Amin Yousafzai, deputy inspector general of police for the southern province of Sindh, which is home to about 50 million people. Sindh is raising a protection unit of about 2,600 police officers to help safeguard 4,000 Chinese working on CPEC projects, and another 1,000 working in other businesses. Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, which signed billions of dollars in contracts with Chinese companies, is also conducting a census of Chinese nationals and raising a force of about 4,200 officers to protect foreigners. Baluchistan would "review the whole security arrangement" and Chinese nationals who come in a private capacity should inform the authorities about their activities, said Anwaar-ul-Haq Kakar, spokesman for the provincial government. The number of militant attacks in Pakistan has fallen sharply in recent years, but violent Islamist groups still pose a threat, and in Baluchistan separatists opposed to CPEC also carry out attacks. The Islamic State killings were a rare attack on Chinese nationals in Pakistan, but the incident has unnerved Islamabad and the growing Chinese community. Miftah Ismail, a state minister involved in CPEC planning, said Pakistan had devoted huge resources to improving security and Chinese investors should not be put off by a one-off attack. "The country's security situation has improved," Ismail said. The scale of the task facing security agencies is increasing by the day as more Chinese entrepreneurs arrive to set up businesses. Most stay in big cities, but some venture into riskier areas. The challenge for authorities will increase in 2018, when the corridor is due to become operational and trucks ferrying goods to and from China cross more than 1,000 km (620 miles) of road in remote Baluchistan areas currently off-limits to foreigners.

New York Times: Bill de Blasio's 'sanctimony [erodes] ข่าวด่วน เดลินิวส์ his credibility' Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Email this article Share on LinkedIn De Blasio's hypocrisy is so glaring, even a New York Times columnist tore into him for it this week. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio is catching heat for asking constituents to be more environmentally conscious while refusing to make changes to his own routine. De Blasio's hypocrisy is so glaring, even a New York Times columnist tore into him for it this week. "Mr. de Blasio," Ginia Bellafante wrote, "seems to have little understanding of how his self-contradictions and sanctimony erode his authority." "When he tells us to stop using plastic grocery bags but doesn't examine his own behavior," she continued, "just for a second my inclination is to throw away my cloth carryalls, go to Key Food and ask that everything I buy be individually wrapped, preferably in double layers of polymer." Earlier this month, the Times described an exchange de Blasio shared with a caller on the Brian Lehrer radio program: "How about you stepping up your game, leading by example, getting out of your S.U.V. armada, and if you need to go to the Park Slope Y five days a week rather than a gym near you, why don't you take mass transit or even once in a while ride a bike like the vast majority of your fellow New Yorkers, so you will know how we are suffering under a transit system?" Charles asked. "Charles, I understand the emotional appeal of what you're saying, but I'm just not going to take the bait, my friend," the mayor responded. "I'm going to keep going to the gym, I'm proud to say we have a hybrid and it's a good car, it's very fuel efficient." Just minutes earlier the mayor said this: "Everyone in their own life has to change their own habits to start protecting the earth." That's hypocrisy so obvious and so shameless, even the New York Times can see it. Emily Jashinsky is a commentary writer for the Washington Examiner.

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